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Google Music Labelled as an 'Oxymoron' by Warner Music Group's Ex-Chairman

Google Music Labelled as an 'Oxymoron' by Warner Music Group's Ex-Chairman

Edgar Bronfman Jr didn't bother to sugarcoat his words just before he relinquished his role as Warner Music Group's Chairman on Tuesday. And he has since changed his tune as well. During a recent exit interview with Peter Kafka from All Things D, Bronfman curtly labelled Googe Music as an 'oxymoron' while proclaiming his new-found support for online music streaming service, Spotify.

Google Music was officially launched in November 2011, although it is exclusive to the US as things stand. Essentially, it enables users to listen and download songs from the Android Market without having to clog their mobile devices with a multitude of music tracks. Google has secured a working partnership with the likes of Universal Music, EMI, and Sony for its mishmash cloud service, but has yet to lock a deal with Warner.

According to Venture Beat's report, Bronfman claims he does not have any thorny issues with Google. However, Warner would only be willing to do business with the search giant after Google has decided if it wants to be a content platform or otherwise. It is likely that Warner Music wants to be thoroughly certain of Google's business approach before they ink the contract. He also added that Google has a "conflicted ideology around content that dates back to its origins as a company focused on the value in the organization of content and not the content itself". As Emma Barnett reports for The Telegraph, Bronfman is inferring that "Google is now contradicting itself by trying to become a content player rather than just an aggregator and host". 

As for Spotify, Bronfman has nothing but good words to offer. "We see Spotify as incrementally positive. It’s not slowing down music sales or downloads. We would all love to make more money from Spotify, but Spotify needs to make money, too. But artists should know that it is a real and growing revenue stream". Interestingly, the man wasn't too keen on the music streaming service two years ago when he stated that "free streaming services are clearly not net positive for the industry, and as far as Warner Music is concerned will not be licensed". Talk about turning tables.

Source: All Things D via The Telegraph & Venture Beat

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