Casings Guide

Cooler Master HAF X review

Cooler Master HAF X - The New Flagship

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Overall rating 9/10
Aesthetics:
8
Functionality:
9.5
Usability:
9
Value:
9
THE GOOD
USB 3.0 ports
Lots of focus on cooling graphics cards
Spacious interior
THE BAD
Not very pretty-looking
VGA bracket fits quite loosely
Side panels immensely heavy


Giant & Mesh - Exterior

Giant & Meshy - Exterior

As a full tower casing, the all-black Cooler Master HAF X cuts an imposing figure with its aggressive styling. You'll find no smooth curves on the HAF X, instead, expect thick, bold lines and angular surfaces. Also, there's extensive use of mesh in the front and top panels to provide optimal ventilation. Clearly, in the case of the HAF X, form takes precedence over function.

And as is the case with most upmarket casings, the HAF X features a see-through plastic window pane on its right panel. However, don't expect to see much because most of this window pane is occupied by a giant 200mm fan, which helps cool your graphics cards.

Aggressive styling and giant fans aside, the HAF X also an equally massive weight to boot - a considerable 14.35kg. With components installed, expect the casing to tip the scales at over 18kg. To help make transporting the casing easy, Cooler Master has thoughtfully provided screw-on wheels for the HAF X.

One of the stand out features of the HAF X is the presence of USB 3.0 ports on the front IO panel, and this makes it one of the few casings available in the market now to offer USB 3.0 connectivity. However, the execution of this is not perfect because to activate these USB 3.0 ports, users are required to route USB cables round the back of the casing to the actual USB 3.0 ports on the motherboard. It is not the most elegant of solutions, but since there's no other way at the moment, it'll have to do. The reason is because at the point of writing, most of the USB 3.0 solutions are an add-on to a motherboard's functionality, so you end up getting USB 3.0 ports on the rear I/O panel and not as USB headers on the board. Thus Cooler Master had no choice but to offer this option.