Notebooks Guide

Apple MacBook Pro (15-inch, Intel Core i7-620M) review

The Apple MacBook Pro: Intel Core i7 Unleashed

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Overall rating 9/10
Design:
9
Features:
9
Performance:
9.5
Value:
8.5
Mobility:
9
THE GOOD
Extremely long battery life
Good performance
THE BAD
Expensive


The Apple Inside

The Apple Inside

If you found the exterior to be similar, the interior too keeps everything the same. Since you'll not find much difference here, let's talk about the minor tweaks in the refreshed version. After all, Apple can't just sell you a new MacBook Pro with just a hardware refresh, right? So let's see what's new underneath.

First off, you have the most talked about function - the automated switchable graphics. Instead of the older system where you had to log in and out to either set it to the integrated or discrete graphics, the newer 15-inch and 17-inch MacBook Pro notebooks will automatically switch depending on the application being used.

We've heard reports of the automatic switchable graphics turning on the discrete even for simple applications like a Twitter client, and our tests with browsers and Flash does show that the system isn't perfect just yet. Hopefully Apple will be able to fix some of the issues already reported by users but we must admit, automated switching technology for graphics will go a long way in helping the newer MacBook Pros live up to the next feature - built-in 10-hour battery life.

We'll find out more if the battery of the newer MacBook Pro notebooks will hold up to the claimed battery life soon enough, but let's take a look at the last feature we would like to highlight - the inertial scrolling. This feature of the trackpad allows for continued scrolling even after you lift your fingers, which well, does help make life easier if you're reading a long document or webpage. Given that there's no hardware change on the trackpad, it's very likely that the inertial scroll feature is software based. As such, we may see this upgrade being made available to older models after a certain 'exclusivity' period, perhaps maybe in Mac OS X 10.6.4.